Calendar

May
14
Tue
Restorative Communication @ Hampton Inn & Conference Center
May 14 @ 9:00 am – 3:30 pm
Restorative Communication @ Hampton Inn & Conference Center | Colchester | Vermont | United States

Presenter Info: Annie O’Shaughnessy, M.Ed in Mindfulness


Date: May 14, 2019   8:30 registration  9:00-3:30 light breakfast and lunch included

Includes: Resource Binder

Target Audience: All educators K-12

Although restorative practices have been used in schools in the U.S. for over 20 years, it has only recently experienced a big uptick in popularity. This is due in large part to the enthusiasm educators have brought to the movement based on the real, day-to-day benefits the practices bring to their lives. The dreaded task of “classroom management,” for example, transforms when we add structures for collaboration and processes to access student voice. Our stress decreases as we do things “with” students rather than “for” them or “to” them.

One of the most powerful things we can do to transform a school culture and climate is to shift the way we communicate that aligns with restorative principles, mindfulness, and trauma informed care. During our day together we will look at a model for restorative communication, share our own experiences, and practice what we’ve learned in real-life scenarios. Throughout the day we will explore how to use restorative communication to build relationships, respond to disruptive behavior, and collaborate in and out of the restorative circle process.

Achievable Outcomes:

  • Examine and reflect on the theory and psychology that informs restorative communication.
  • Learn and use the circle process to practice mindful presence and share our thoughts on restorative communication.
  • Reflect on our own effective and ineffective default communication styles and those of the staff we work with.
  • Explore and practice a mindfulness and trauma informed approach to restorative communication.
RestorativeCommunication
RestorativeCommunication
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About our Presenter: Annie O’Shaughnessy has an M.Ed in Mindfulness for Educators, Level I & II Training in Modern Mindfulness, Level 1 & 2 Restorative Justice, CircleWork Leadership Training and Restorative Justice Summer Institute and has taught Mindfulness, Restorative Practices and Rites of Passage to K12 Educators.

May
17
Fri
Using Restorative Practices to Respond to Harm @ Hampton Inn & Conference Center
May 17 @ 9:00 am – 3:30 pm
Using Restorative Practices to Respond to Harm @ Hampton Inn & Conference Center | Colchester | Vermont | United States

Presenter Info: Annie O’Shaughnessy, M.Ed in Mindfulness

with Bobby Riley, Principal Integrated Arts Academy (IAA), Burlington School District


Date: May 17, 2019   8:30 registration  9:00-3:30 light breakfast and lunch included

Includes: Resource Binder

Target Audience: All educators K-12, Leaders, Behavior Coaches and Planning Room Teachers

The “Zero Tolerance” policies put into place in the 1990s to combat school violence, blossomed into rigid exclusionary discipline policies for many different student behaviors from tobacco, weapon, and drug possession to vandalism and disrespect. While suspension and expulsion rates rose, the policies did not have the intended effect of making schools safer and more supportive places to learn. In fact, as stated in Vermont’s Agency of Education resource book on restorative practices, “Trying to achieve safe school environments that promote learning through compliance and exclusion have been ineffective and such efforts have disproportionately negatively affected specific populations that are typically marginalized”.

The current popularity of restorative practices in schools has risen up out of the need for an alternative to exclusionary discipline policies. From the VT AOE guide: “Restorative approaches promote social engagement and connection (1) proactively to build community and connection (Tier I), (2) when things go wrong and relationship need repair (Tier II), and (3) when an individual needs more intensive support to feel a sense of belonging (Tier III). Research shows a clear connection between outcomes and students’ sense of connection, belonging, and being part of the school community”.  This workshop explores Tier 2 processes—how to respond to harm in schools in a variety of restorative ways.

Achievable Outcomes:

  • Examine how we know we are ready for Tier 2 work—when to proceed, when not to and why.
  • Explore what is the right process and why—restorative “chat” or conversation, circle, conference.
  • Practice and debrief all of three processes.

 

About our Presenters:  Annie O’Shaughnessy has taught since 1990 in public, alternative and therapeutic settings.  She pursued her M.Ed. in Mindfulness for Educators in 2016 and has taught in multiple settings, both workshops and classes throughout Vermont. read more…

Bobby Riley is the principal of the Integrated Arts Academy (IAA), one of two magnet schools in Burlington, Vermont and is a passionate champion of PBIS, restorative practices, mindfulness, SEL and the power of the arts in transforming education.read more…

Aug
5
Mon
Proficiency-Based Learning: A Framework for Clarity & Equity @ South Burlington School District
Aug 5 – Aug 9 all-day

Instructor: Michael Martin, Ed.D.

Dates: August 5 – 9, 2019   Time: 8:00 am – 3:00 pm

Includes the book: Understanding by Design (Wiggins & McTighe, 2005, 2nd Expanded Edition)

 

Target Audience: K- 12 Educators

Despite a great deal of innovation and hard work by Vermont educators, the current transition to proficiency-based learning (PBL) has raised a number of important questions about unit design, assessment, and grading. The purpose of this course is to provide structures and strategies that help clarify next steps for teachers and school leaders who are engaged in this work and are responsible for communicating this change to students, families and the wider community. The operating assumption is that proficiency-based learning will improve equitable student outcomes through greater precision, transparency, and relevance thanks to intentionally structured learning activities and assessment. The course will examine the importance of habits of learning, growth mindset, and how feedback practices can either help or hinder future growth. This course will incorporate a variety of resources, including Understanding by Design (Wiggins & McTighe, 2006) as a framework to help teachers create purposeful units driven by authentic assessment and inquiry. Participants will have time to learn through professional dialogue, examine their own assessment strategies, and apply PBL principles to their own work during the course meeting time.

Course participants will learn how to:
● explain the purpose of PBL in simple terms to students, families & community members
● assess transferable skills in concert with content-area proficiencies
● create a hierarchy of standards in order to simplify and clarify unit planning, assessment & reporting
● develop formative assessment strategies that are manageable for teachers

PBL Framework Summer19
PBL Framework Summer19
PBL-Framework.summer19.pdf
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Michael Martin, Ed.D. is the Director of Learning for South Burlington School District and a Senior Associate with the Rowland Foundation. read more
Aug
12
Mon
Universal Design for Learning: A Framework for Inclusion @ South Burlington School District
Aug 12 – Aug 16 all-day

Instructor: Michael Martin, Ed.D.

Dates: August 12 – 16, 2019   Time: 8:00 am – 3:00 pm

Includes the book: UDL Now! A Teacher’s Guide to Applying Universal Design for Learning in Today’s Classrooms (Novak, K. (2016)

 

Target Audience: K- 12 Educators

Many schools are now turning to Universal Design for Learning (UDL) as a powerful framework for inclusion that also unifies important initiatives including but not limited to proficiency-based learning (PBL), social emotional learning (SEL), and a multi-tiered system of support (MTSS). Universal Design for Learning has been nationally recognized as best first instruction for all learners with its basic precept being to first remove barriers in learning environments before resorting to curriculum modifications and accommodations. UDL is a framework to advance equity because its research-based, learner-centered approach emphasizes engagement, access, and expression for all learners. But as a classroom teacher, where to begin? This course will provide teachers with a foundational understanding of UDL and actionable strategies for making their classrooms more inclusive. Course participants will deepen their understanding of UDL through course readings, professional dialogue, peer observations, and classroom practice.

Course participants will learn how to:

  • make meaningful connections between various school initiatives and the UDL brain-based guidelines
  • exhibit an understanding of how UDL strategies can improve outcomes for all learners
  • reexamine classroom norms & routines through an equity lens with an eye to engaging all learners
  • develop specific UDL classroom strategies for inclusion
  • improve learner agency through intentional strategies to foster expert learners
UDLflyer Summer19
UDLflyer Summer19
UDLflyer.summer19.pdf
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Michael Martin, Ed.D. is the Director of Learning for South Burlington School District and a Senior Associate with the Rowland Foundation. read more